A photo of hoes

Weeding tip from the Urban Farm

The hoes on the left the red ones are oscillating or stirrup hoes. The other ones are collinear hoes designed by Eliot Coleman. At the Urban Farm and Community Garden at the moment we are busy direct sowing, and sowing and planting modules. It is a busy month in the farm and we are enjoying seeing it take shape. I thought I would just say something about our approach to weeding. We start ouRead More…

Nuclear Energy; the pros and cons

Background We are surrounded by matter, made up of atoms, each of which contains enormous amounts of energy in the bonds that hold the atom together. This energy can be released through controlled nuclear fission to produce heat, steam and ultimately electricity, or through uncontrolled fission to produce atomic bombs, like Little Boy and Fat Boy, which were dropped on Hiroshima and NagasakiRead More…

Seed Sowing Galore!

The gardens are
beginning to buzz as they slowly are bursting with new life.  Signs of
springs such as frog spawn, bumble bees and yellow daffodils is a sure sign that
it is time to start sowing those seeds.     While out in the Edible
Campus gardens, we have now cleared out the last of the leeks, dug up the final
jerusalem artichoke and have done a final push of weeding anRead More…

Ready, steady…grow!

Since the new year we have been busy putting together our crop plans for the Community Vegetable garden and the Urban Farm. This year we will be growing a wide range of crops with around 50 different types of vegetables, which will allow us to deliver a wide range of learning experiences, as well as a varied diet! We have just about finished our sowing and planting schedule and we are particulaRead More…

Plotting for a Productive Year!

Edible campus volunteers have been busy planning  their garden plots for the spring with the help of our favourite online planning tool, GrowVeg.  Mapping out our crops is not only easy and fun but optimists the space we have, and helps to plan out times for sowing and planting out.   Meanwhile, the garden sessions are continuing either weekly or biweekly at most of the sites wherRead More…

Kale Chips! recipe

It’s February and the community gardens still have food in them, including Brassicas, the cabbage family plants. Kale, cabbage, and brussels sprouts are still green and seem to shrug off the snow and frosts and even keep growing (all be it slowly). So what tasty treats can we make with these? One of my favorites is Kale Chips. For Kale Chips, all you need are: some kale leaves- washed, the tRead More…

Apple: Cambusnethan Pippin

The Guardbridge Community garden is full of surprises! Not least an apple tree with an actual name label still attached.
The Cambusnethan Pippin apple tree was struggling along, despite it’s main leader branch having been snapped, the encroachment of a very vigorous poplar sucker system, and plenty of neglect, it was still staked and gamely trying to grow towards the light. A little googling lateRead More…

A photo of Main Kernel Plot

Improving the soil at the Urban Farm

This is just a quick catch-up to welcome in the New Year. Before Christmas we had been busy working on our bed preparation on the farm. We have altered the pH, making it more acidic by adding some elemental sulfur. Hopefully this will bring it closer to the optimum pH of 6.5 where the most amount of nutrients are available to the plants. We are also adding some food and soil life with a layer Read More…

Skirrets!

Going back to our Roots Or The return of a Medieval Vegetable to St Andrews. I first heard of Skirrets (Sium sisarum) at the end of 2017 after reading a copy of The Scots Gard’ner by John Reid (published 1683). At first I thought that it was a different name for a common vegetable, but a bit of googling corrected me. It was a popular root vegetable across Europe during the Tudor times, anRead More…

Meadow Making: Guardbridge Community Garden

There have been big changes at the Guardbridge community garden since a team of dedicated volunteers have been meeting up most Friday’s from 10-12noon (and some of them visiting between sessions). One of the most obvious changes, as you walk into the garden, is the management of the central meadow area. In the UK, meadows have been estimated to have declined by 97% since the 1930s. The maiRead More…

Elliott outlining principles of Urban Farming at the Kernel Anniversary event

Growing at the Kernel in October

Things are progressing nicely at the Kernel growing space. After cultivation in the early autumn, the growing site seems to be draining well but the winter will be our real test. We are enjoying the last of late crop of tomatoes and peppers and preparing to overwinter crops in fleece tunnels to extend our season. This will supply us with fresh produce early next season. Along with the polytunnRead More…